Posts Tagged ‘Health’

Effective Natural Treatments for Tension Headaches
Posted By Dr. Ben Kim
Source: http://drbenkim.com/tension-headache-acupressure.html

Tension-type headaches typically involve dull or pressure-like pain in and around your temples, forehead, scalp, or the back of your neck. Often times, the pain associated with a tension-type headache will feel like it is being created by a band of pressure that is tightening around your head.

Although emotional stress, anxiety, and depression are among the most common causes of chronic, intermittent tension-type headaches, tension headaches can also be caused by pure physical stressors, such as poor posture, sleeping with your neck in an awkward position, or any type of physical injury that has caused muscles in and around your head and neck to become tight.

Unlike migraine and cluster headaches, tension-type headaches tend to respond quickly to simple physical measures. What follows are the key recommendations that I typically share with clients who are looking to overcome chronic tension-type headaches via simple lifestyle measures:

  1. Spend a minimum of 20 minutes each day in a session of meditation or deep relaxation. Doing so can help alleviate emotional stressors that may be contributing to your tension-type headaches. For meditation and relaxation sessions, I have found EarthRain to be an enormously effective tool.
  2. Be mindful of positions that your neck and head are forced to take on for extended periods throughout the day. Strive to position your neck and head in such a way that you do not feel tension in your eyes, neck, or shoulders. Reading and writing with your neck bent down and to one side are killer culprits – do what you can to minimize this posture.
  3. Upon receiving approval from your primary health care provider, consider applying manual pressure to the following acupuncture points:
    1. Gall Bladder 20 (GB-20): Located behind your head in the first major depression that you can feel below the base of your skull, about two finger widths away from the midline of your neck. Picture of GB-20 For those with knowledge of human anatomy: This point is at the junction of the occipital and nuchal regions, in a depression that lies between the origins of the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles. It is approximately at the level of the lower margin of the external occipital protuberance.Application of pressure to GB-20 is meant to affect:
      • Semispinalis capitis muscle
      • Splenius capitis muscle
      • Rectus capitis posterior muscle
      • Obliquus capitis superior muscle
      • Greater occipital nerve
      • Less occipital nerve
      • Suboccipital nerve (C1)
      • Motor fibers from dorsal rami of upper cervical nerves
      • Branches of the occipital artery and tributaries of the companion vein
    2. Belly of Your Temporalis Muscle*: Located in the center of your temple region. Palpate this region with your first and middle fingers pressed closely together until you find a tender, muscular zone. If you have trouble locating this point, place your fingers against your temples and then bite down on your molars a few times – you should feel the main muscle belly of your temporalis muscles bulge in and out.Picture of approximate location of belly of Temporalis muscleFor those with knowledge of human anatomy, pressure on the belly of the temporalis muscle is meant to affect:
      • Deep temporal nerves that branch off from the third division (mandibular) of the trigeminal nerve
      • Cutaneous branches of the greater occipital nerve
      • Deep temporal artery and companion vein
    3. Large Intestine 4 (LI-4): Located in the soft, fleshy web that sits between your thumb and forefinger.Picture of LI-4 at Acuxo.comFor those with knowledge of human anatomy, this point is meant to affect:
      • A muscular branch of the median nerve
      • The deep branch of the ulnar nerve
      • Proper palmer digital nerves from the first common palmar digital nerve
      • The superficial branch of the radial nerve
      • Tributary branches of the cephalic vein, the radial artery, and the first dorsal metacarpal artery and companion veins

For optimal results, use your fingers and/or thumbs to massage these points on bothsides of your body for a few minutes at a time, up to several times a day. When you correctly locate these points, you should feel some tenderness when you apply pressure to them. Apply enough pressure/massage to create a mild, dull, and possibly achy sensation.

If you are not sure about the location of GB-20 and LI-4, I highly recommend that you take a look at the following book, the best of its kind:

Acupressure’s Potent Points: a Guide to Self-Care for Common Ailments

I recommend this as a must-have reference book for every person who is interested in natural health remedies, as it provides excellent illustrations of all of the major acupressure points that can be used to treat a wide variety of health challenges. I will continue to refer to various points that are illustrated in this book as I write more articles on how to use acupressure to address different health challenges.

Beyond using acupressure to address tension-type headaches, you can also go through a series of six simple stretches to keep the muscles that surround your head and neck at a healthy tone. To view these stretches, click here:

Simple Exercises to Promote Healthy Neck Muscles and Ligaments

It may also be helpful to stretch your mid and upper back in the following fashion:

How to Stretch the Thoracic Region of your Spine

Please note: If you find that consistent application of the suggestions provided in this article does not lead to significant improvement with your headaches, you should consult with your primary health care provider to rule out other less common causes of pain and discomfort in your head and neck regions.

* The belly of your temporalis muscle does not contain a classically defined acupuncture meridian point. It is a point that I have found through personal clinical experience to be an effective treatment site for tension-type headaches.

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We’ve all heard how badly newspapers and the Postal Service are hurting. Even if we didn’t hear about it in the news all the time, we would have to assume they can’t be doing too great. After all, when was the last time you licked an envelope or got black ink on your fingers? On the other hand, unless we intentionally seek out info on it, the suffering of some other industries may escape us. The Bureau of Labor Statistics has made its predictions of which industries will decline the most by 2020 in both output and employment. We broke down 10 of the ones that surprised us.

  1. Defense:

    One would think even hawks could agree that military spending that accounts for 58% of spending in the entire world is, dare we say, enough already. With the passage of 2011′s Budget Control Act, Congress finally acknowledged that the military could afford to make some sacrifices to help meet a $1.2 trillion goal of federal spending cuts over the next 10 years. The news is not welcome for the civilian defense industry (what the BLS calls “general federal defense government compensation”), which is predicted to lose $16.5 billion in output and just shy of 50,000 jobs by 2020.
    (more…)

 

Sitting at your desk all day can literally be a pain in the neck. This 4-minute video from GAIAM yoga instructor Rodney Yee can help loosen tight neck and shoulder muscles, relieving stress.

If you carry a lot of your stress in your shoulder area, these quick exercises are a great relief. The nice thing about desk yoga stretches is you don’t need a lot of space or time to do them, but you can feel the effects right away.

This video from GAIAM is part of a series of desk yoga videos from famous instructor Rodney Yee. If you have another 15 minutes to spare, be sure to check out the desk yoga videos for yourbackhead and eyes, and breathing. We’ve also previously noted yoga exercises for preventing office wrist pain. Namaste!

Source: http://lifehacker.com/5797933/take-4-minutes-to-ease-neck-and-shoulder-tension-with-desk-yoga

 

 

By
Source: http://www.inc.com/kevin-daum/7-tips-for-creating-your-own-destiny.html

Are you working on your life or just in it? Here is the perspective and method you need to plan and execute the life and career worthy of your potential.

Too many people whine about not having the life they want. The main reason people fall short of their own expectations is the same reason most companies fail to achieve their objectives: poor planning and execution. In fact, I am amazed at how many successful executives create strategy for their business, leaving their life to chance. Often it’s more comfortable (note I didn’t say easier) to complain and blame outside factors for lack of accomplishment or unhappiness than to take time to work on life rather than in it.

I choose otherwise. A close entrepreneur friend, J, and I are taking our annual four days away to determine our futures and hold each other accountable. Here are the tips that will assure us of success. 

1. Plan a Preferred Future

As Lewis Carroll said: If you don’t know where you are going, then any road will get you there. Both J and I are close to 50, so our 60th birthdays are the milestone for this journey. Twelve years is plenty of time to make course corrections and absorb any external factors thrown at us. Our planning will be specific and measurable. We’ll take time to examine and discuss the details of every aspect of our lives, personal and professional, to achieve integrated success and happiness. 

2. Be Pragmatic

Neither of us will be playing for the NBA at our age (or my height). The future has to reflect what is physically possible with available resources and limitations. Pragmatism isn’t in itself restrictive, however; J and I will harness our creativity to design aspirational futures that exploit every opportunity and asset we have. We’ll also create filters to keep us from wasting time and energy on what’s unachievable or irrelevant. 

3. Decide the Who, Not the What

We’re defining who we want to be at 60, not what we want to be doing. The who centers on passion, core competencies, and core satisfaction, such as material requirements. If I know who I truly want to be, I can detail what to do, own, resources I need, etc. I can also determine what not to do, own, etc., focusing time and resources where required.

4. Be Honest

J and I will challenge each other constantly to get to the truth of who we are and who we wish to be. There will be no quiet politeness on this trip (not that I’m capable of it). I can’t let J believe his own stories and rationalizations, causing misdirection and distraction. Warning: Allowing this dialogue requires intimate knowledge of each other and great trust. Pick your accountability partners wisely.

5. Consider the Tools Around You, Old and New

Every resource is important. On my old list is Napoleon Hill, who nearly 100 years ago connected creative visualization to success. And I will also consider new resources like crowdsourcing. Although I’m a natural skeptic for overhyped Internet trends, my friend and talented designer Elena Kriegner inspired me with her KickStarter campaign. It’s simple, interesting, and elegant (like her jewelry), which is why it’s gaining traction, unlike many others. In this planning exercise, no resources, new or old, are off the table to achieve my desired future.

6. Ignore the Naysayers

I live for constructive criticism. But outside perspective that is baseless conjecture or stems from emotional baggage (think dissatisfied family or friends) is destructive for achievers. Put these people in a box where they can’t distract you from your ambitions. Find people who get it, and put them in your corner. Engage them in your preferred future, and help them achieve theirs.

7. Don’t Settle for Mediocrity

Although being the next Steve Jobs or U.S. President is likely off our agenda (as it should be), J and I both want to be pushed to the limits of our potential. Too many people settle for what is easy rather than engage their energy and creativity to create something different and meaningful. Then they wonder why their work has no significance. I choose to pursue the Awesome Experience.

People who take a reactive approach to growth and development will suffer the same fate as companies, managers, and employees who let the markets, technology, and competitors determine their destiny. The game of life rewards aggressive players who leverage their energy, smarts (note that I didn’t say intelligence), and creativity to determine and obtain the life that truly makes them happy. As Jim Collins points out in Great by Choice, good and bad luck comes to all; it’s how you plan and execute that determines your return on luck.

Note: If you’re interested in learning more about this process, contact me. I can share more specifics and tools from my small-group facilitations on preferred futuring. Perhaps you are ready to live your preferred future. Don’t hope for it; determine, plan, and execute.

 

I ran across this great website called mindtools.com.  There are a lot of tools there for time management and brainstorming etc.  It’s worth checking out.  Below is an excerpt from one of their pages on managing time.  Click any of the links or image below to go to their website. Enjoy!


This section of Mind Tools teaches you time management skills. These are the simple, practical techniques that have helped the leading people in business, sport and public service reach the pinnacles of their careers.

The 40+ skills taught here help you become highly effective, by showing you how to identify and focus on the activities that give you the greatest returns. Doing this will save you time, helping you work smarter, not harder. What’s more, these same techniques help you beat work overload – a key source of stress.

Start with our short time management quiz, which helps you target the techniques that will help you most, and then explore the other articles. In particular, take a look at our prioritization and goal setting resources – these are exceptionally important.

The Browse by Category box below will help you find specific skills, and you can skim through the list below to find useful topics. Enjoy them!

Browse by Category

Source: http://www.mindtools.com/pages/main/newMN_HTE.htm